The Nightshirt Sightings, Portents, Forebodings, Suspicions

Posts tagged with “Dreams”

The Ancient Art of Memory & the Modern Science of Dreaming

Sunday, 28 August, 2016

Check out my essay on dreaming and the ancient art of memory (hint: they operate on the same principles), the lead article in this month’s special issue of New Dawn magazine. You can also read the essay with its graphics by downloading a copy of Special Issue Vol 10 No 4 (PDF version) for US$5.95. […]

Wyrd, Post-Selection, and the Quantum Trickster

Saturday, 7 May, 2016

English is blessed with a large and fascinating family of w-r words connoting twisting, turning, and turning-into (in the sense of becoming)—think writhing wriggling worms and the wrath of wraiths. (See my ancient post about “werewords” if you are curious.) My favorite of this family is Wyrd, which comes from the Old English weorthan, “to […]

Quantum Psychoanalysis: Interpreting Precognitive Dreams

Monday, 16 November, 2015

Near the end of Christopher Nolan’s 2014 film Interstellar, astronaut “Coop” is able to communicate with his younger self (as well as his daughter) decades in the past using a tesseract, a theoretical multidimensional portal created by our descendents thousands or millions of years in the future. Coop’s messages are oblique—he can’t address his younger […]

Unknown Unknowns: Psi, Association & the Physics of Information

Sunday, 5 July, 2015

I have always been skeptical of parapsychologists, because their experiments and their theories borrow the standard concepts of space and time dimensions from physics. These concepts seem obsolete to me. They are not appropriate for understanding telepathy, or the moving of objects at a distance, or ghosts, or Melchizedek. I have always been struck also […]

The Great Work of Immortality: Astral Travel, Dreams, and Alchemy

Saturday, 16 May, 2015

The ceramic-and-glass sculptures shown in this article are by artist Christina Bothwell, used with her kind permission. Judging from the number of books and YouTube videos now available on the subject, out-of-body experiences (OOBEs) seem to be enjoying a contemporary revival, and there is surely no hobby more ontologically controversial. Several authors, including Robert Monroe […]

Feeding the Psi God: Precognitive Dreaming, Memory, and Ritual

Wednesday, 6 May, 2015

I’ve mentioned several times the debt I owe to J.W. Dunne and his 1927 book An Experiment with Time. Dunne was not a scientific researcher or a parapsychologist by training, but a military man and aeronautical engineer who became interested in questions of time and its structure after becoming aware of uncanny examples of apparent […]

Scarabs & the ‘Send’ Button: Synchronicity as Misrecognized Psi

Friday, 10 April, 2015

During the weeks I was researching my previous post on 9/11 and premonitions of trauma, I had a very powerful, uncanny experience that contained, in miniature, all of that post’s themes. It began with an unusually bad day at work, where I’d felt extremely guilty over a group email I had sent to coworkers that, […]

Trauma Displaced in Time: Premonition, Synchronicity, and Enjoyment

Saturday, 28 March, 2015

On the morning of September 11, 2001, my alarm awoke me around 6:30AM and I did what I always try to do before dragging myself from bed: I rolled over, grabbed my notebook and pen, and jotted notes on whatever dream images I could recall from the night before. That morning I noted dreaming about […]

The Solaris Mind: Hypnagogia, Meditation, and Insight

Sunday, 8 March, 2015

A classic motif in science fiction is that humanity ventures to the farthest reaches of space only to find, impossibly, something of our own that we had forgotten. Stanislaw Lem’s 1961 novel Solaris, about a planet covered by a viscous ocean that manufactures simulacra from its observers’ unconscious, is probably the purest expression of this […]

When Is It Hyperfootball Season?—Rethinking Eternalism

Sunday, 14 December, 2014

There are rumblings from the Internet that graphic novelist and magus Alan Moore is soon to drop a million-word novel on the world, called Jerusalem. It shows great courage and faith, in a world that no longer reads books, that Moore has stretched out his text as much as possible instead of compressing his ideas […]